Sports Curling

Dominion Tankard sweeps its way into Barrie 0

By Ian McInroy, Barrie Examiner

Former Barrie mayor and avid curler Willard Kinzie, 93, is one of more than 200 volunteers helping to make the Dominion Tankard Barrie 2013 a success. It runs at the Barrie Molson Centre until Sunday. IAN MCINROY BARRIE EXAMINER

Former Barrie mayor and avid curler Willard Kinzie, 93, is one of more than 200 volunteers helping to make the Dominion Tankard Barrie 2013 a success. It runs at the Barrie Molson Centre until Sunday. IAN MCINROY BARRIE EXAMINER

The spirit of Rebecca Duck’s great-great-grandfather may have visited the Barrie Molson Centre on Monday afternoon.

The Mississauga resident — who admits she has a lifelong addiction to curling — was rooting for Team Prebble during the opening day of competition at the Dominion Tankard Barrie 2013.

But while she was sitting in the stands at the BMC, she was reminded of a relative who was curling at a similar event more than a century ago.

Her great-great-grandfather, George Hogg, won the Ontario Tankard in 1908 and was a member of the Barrie Curling Club. Team Prebble plays on Tuesday nights in the Toronto Men’s Major League at the St. George’s Golf and Country Club, where Duck is an ice technician.

“I work curling, live curling and love curling,” she says happily, adding that the Dominion Tankard ice is definitely up to the task. “It looks pretty good. I was here at the ice-making clinic on Saturday.”

Former Barrie mayor and avid curler Willard Kinzie — a youthful 93-year-old — is one of more than 200 volunteers helping to make the provincial men’s curling championship a success.

“It’s wonderful that it’s come to Barrie. It boosts the whole community spirit,” he said. “It’s a great opportunity for people to see what Barrie is all about and what a beautiful city it is. Many of the visitors have brought their families and when they’re not curling they’ll be spending money at Barrie businesses.”

Kinzie said the sport helps keep his mind and body young.

“It’s attractive for so many reasons: the exercise, the functioning in the brain. There’s a lot

of thinking in curling and an important aspect is the mixture of people,” he said. “You get a great variety of opinions on life.”

Craig Laing, of Tottenham, had his eyes on Team Howard and was pleased with what he’s seen of the event so far, early in the weeklong tournament.

“It’s all pretty good. They’ve got a formula that works, good seating pricing and lots of parking. It’s good curling and generally pretty competitive. It’s nice to have the opportunity to see it,” he said. “It’s an intricate, challenging game and a social sport. And I’ve got a little competitive bone in me that likes to play.”

Tourism Barrie executive director Kathleen Trainor said the Tankard is a win for Barrie.

“We believe there will be a lot of television coverage. It has a huge economic impact. It’s free advertising,” she said. “Thousands of people in a broad market are looking at this. And certainly when you have an event like this, the economic impact goes to other things.”

ian.mcinroy@sunmedia.ca

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