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Barrie townhouse project reduced by councillors

Bob Bruton

By Bob Bruton, Barrie Examiner

City councillors made some adjustments to a proposed stacked townhouse project in north-end Barrie, Monday. They gave initial approval to reduce a development to 84 from 92 units on 101 Kozlov St., and to move or eliminate a planned roadway. MARK WANZEL/PHOTO

City councillors made some adjustments to a proposed stacked townhouse project in north-end Barrie, Monday. They gave initial approval to reduce a development to 84 from 92 units on 101 Kozlov St., and to move or eliminate a planned roadway. MARK WANZEL/PHOTO

City councillors did a little downsizing Monday of a proposed stacked townhouse project in north Barrie.

They gave initial approval to reduce a development to 84 from 92 units on 101 Kozlov St., and to move or eliminate a planned roadway.

Coun. Barry Ward, who represents this area, noted 120 units were originally proposed and now it's 92 – but it's still too tight for the 5.7-acre property.

“My objection to the proposal in general is ... they've jammed either a building or parking onto every square inch of that property,” he said. “There's just not room for anything else.

“We've been talking about the need to have developments where there's some green space so that the water can go in them. We've got a place here where they're basically going to pave over this entire section of land. It just seems excessive,” Ward said.

Green Valley Construction needs to change one type of multiple residential dwelling zoning to another to build the 3.5 storey townhouses.

There is an existing seven storey, 129-unit apartment building already on this property – located on the east side of Kozlov, south of Livingstone Street West and north of Heather Street.

Ward's amendment also included a reduction of nine or 10 parking spaces, and that

the road west of building two be eliminated or moved to a location between buildings one and two.

He said the roadway is too close to the backyards of existing homes.

“People usually have their bedrooms (facing) the back yard, they have their windows open,” he said. “They don't want cars in the middle of winter and summer driving right behind their backyard fence.

“They don't want lights flashing in their bedroom windows. I don't think that's the best place for this road.”

Mayor Jeff Lehman agreed with the downsizing.

“We're taking an area where you've got a very large green lawn and that creates some of the character of the area, and paving over nearly every inch of it,” he said.

Lehman did note, however, that the motion includes special provisions which are greater requirements on the developer – tighter standards – such as larger setbacks, landscape buffer areas and side yard setback.

Both Ward and Lehman noted that stacked townhouses are appropriate transitional development in an area with a high-rise and single-family homes.

But Ward did ask staff about density in the area.

“Why are we being asked to approve intensification in areas where it wasn't originally planned?” he asked

“The Official Plan policy does specifically speak to the ability to consider intensification outside of the nodes and corridors, or the downtown, the urban core area,” said city planning director Andrea Bourrie.

Barrie's intensification policy establishes four principle areas where intensification is encouraged, including: the Urban Growth Centre, or downtown Barrie and Allandale; primary and secondary corridors consisting of arterial roads such as Bayfield and Dunlop streets, Essa Road, Duckworth and Yonge streets; primary and secondary nodes at significant intersections along the primary and secondary corridors; and South Barrie GO Station near Yonge Street and Mapleview Drive East.

A series of guidelines have also been created to help direct new development within these intensification areas, and are viewed to be complementary to the existing city urban design guidelines.

bbruton@postmedia.com

 



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