News Local

Paper stars carry a message

By Susan Doolan, Special to Postmedia Network

Andrea Frontzek, left, a co-worker with Camphill Communities day program, spearheaded the Barrie contribution toward ‘One Million Stars to End Violence’, global project destined for the 2018 Commonwealth Games. Chloe Garner, right, was one of many who helped create around 200 stars. SUSAN DOOLAN/PHOTO

Andrea Frontzek, left, a co-worker with Camphill Communities day program, spearheaded the Barrie contribution toward ‘One Million Stars to End Violence’, global project destined for the 2018 Commonwealth Games. Chloe Garner, right, was one of many who helped create around 200 stars. SUSAN DOOLAN/PHOTO

Around 200 paper stars, handmade in Barrie, are winging their way across continents to become part of an Australian project to end violence worldwide.

Founder Maryann Talia Pau started the global weaving project, called One Million Stars to End Violence, to encourage people to be “light and kindness they want to see in the world.”

All of the stars from countries around the world, made by solo individuals or at specially created Star Weave Jams, will become part of an art installation for the 2018 Commonwealth Games, April 4-5 on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Barrie’s contribution was spearheaded by Andrea Frontzek, who works with adults who have cognitive and developmental disabilities at Camphill’s day programs. She organized two weaving jams at the Camphill Store in downtown Barrie which garnered interest from shoppers who stopped by to help make some of the stars.

The stars were on display in the store window prior to leaving for Australia mid-July.

“It was an excellent project to engage people with different abilities so no one was left out, (including) co-workers,” said Andrea Frontzek. “Everyone was involved in the painting of paper. The more complex it got, people had to judge: what is my ability?

“And, we also opened it up to the public, hosted a weaving jam in the store, and put it online, asked random people to participate. The response has been just phenomenal how people were called to it.”

Weaving is just one aspect of Camphill, which is “dedicated to creating unique and inspiring residential, vocational and learning opportunities for people” with intellectual disabilities in both rural and urban settings, Barrie and Camphill Nottawasaga, which is a working farm on the outskirts of Angus. There are 30 residents and an additional 25 fee-for-service day program participants from the greater community.

Men and women alike participated in the project. Chloe Garner, 29, painted the paper by hand and then did the folding.

“It’s fun,” she said. “I like all the colours.”

She also participates in the Camphill’s café, the mosaic studio and helps to create the draped, folded pots which are a popular item in the store. Through the various programs, participants also make pottery in the Angus studio, or work and create cutting boards and the like in the wood shop.

Beyond the day programs, Garner enjoys making pictures of places she has visited, such as Michigan, California and Toronto. She so impressed with her first time on an airplane, she made a picture of it, too. Garner, who lives in a shared home community in Barrie, likes to tell a story with her pictures.

Barrie’s stars left the city mid-July as they were due in Australia on July 31. The Museum of Brisbane is expected to design the art installation which will be on display during the games at City Hall in Brisbane.

For more on the star project, visit www.onemillionstars.net



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