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Barrie fire service receives 100 carbon monoxide detectors

The Insurance Bureau of Canada presented more than 100 carbon monoxide detectors to the Barrie Fire & Emergency Service on Friday. On hand for the donation are, from left, Matt Hiraishi, the bureau's manager of government relations, Barrie Fire Chief Bill Boyes, and Barrie MPP Ann Hoggarth.
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The Insurance Bureau of Canada presented more than 100 carbon monoxide detectors to the Barrie Fire & Emergency Service on Friday. On hand for the donation are, from left, Matt Hiraishi, the bureau's manager of government relations, Barrie Fire Chief Bill Boyes, and Barrie MPP Ann Hoggarth. SUBMITTED

(STAFF) - The Barrie Fire & Emergency Service received a special lifesaving delivery Friday morning.

The service received a donation of more than 100 carbon monoxide detectors courtesy of the Insurance Bureau of Canada.

Barrie MPP Ann Hoggarth was on hand, along with the bureau's manager of government relations, Matt Hiraishi, to do the honours at the service's Dunlop Street headquarters.

The donation is part of an awareness campaign regarding the dozens of deaths each year in Canada attributed to the deadly gas.

In 2013, the province passed Bill 77- The Hawkins Gignac Act making CO detectors mandatory in all homes heated by fossil fuels, or have an attached garage.

The legislation was named in honour of Richard and Laurie Hawkins and their two children who died as a result of CO poisoning in 2008. Laurie Hawkins was an OPP officer. Their Woodstock home did not have a CO detector.

"What we are doing today reinforces Ontario's role as this country's public safety leader," said Hoggarth. "Our message is simple: If you don't have a CO alarm in your home, get one. It might end up being one of the most important decisions you make."

The city fire service plans to distribute the detectors during an awareness week in October.

"As we head into the first long weekend of the cottage season, it's important to remember that the only way to make the silent killer noisy is with a working carbon monoxide alarm," said Barrie Fire Chief Bill Boyes, adding alarms should also should be installed at the cottage or trailer.

To date, Hiraishi said more than 60,000 alarms have been donated in more than 60 communities provincewide.

Facts:

  • More than 50 people die each year from CO poisoning in Canada, including 11 on average in Ontario
  • Residents have a responsibility to know about the dangers of CO and that an alarm is a good second line of defence, but not a substitute for the proper care and maintenance of fuel burning appliances.
  • Take tie to learn about the use of carbon monoxide alarms in your home.
  • The suggested location for a CO alarm is as near as possible to sleeping areas of the home, since the human body is most vulnerable to the effects of carbon monoxide during sleep.
  • To work properly, the alarm must not be blocked by furniture or drapery. CO is virtually the same weight as air so alarms protect you in a high or low location.
  • Detectors must be replaced every seven to 10 years


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